January 9 2017

Journal/Planner Overlap

As I was getting everything together for 2017, my planner/journal systems, I realized I had a bit of overlap. Last year I started out the year with a Leonie Dawson planner, a bullet journal in a Leuchtturm 1917,  my Omni Journal, and my writer bullet journal, along with a few other things. Within a month or so I knew that I wouldn’t really use the ring bound planner–I’m not a fan of ring bound or spiral bound notebooks, journals, planners. I have a large ring binder that I store my writing stuff in: research, printouts, etc, but it is for reference only, I don’t work out of it.

And as the year progressed, I soon realized that bullet journaling was being merged with my art journal/chronicle your life journal/Hobonichi-Fauxbonichi style journaling, so I (once again) combined bullet journaling with everything else that was in my Omni Journal. My hybrid/everything/catchall journal. 🙂

 

For #onebookjuly2016 I used my Omni Journal for everything, except for the writing stuff. I learned how to use the “one journal for all” and as the month progressed I learned that I could even include my writing stuff in the Omni Journal, at least the basics, like shiny new ideas that pop into my head, or a line that kept bugging me, or a character that didn’t want to act right… Working things out on paper is so much easier for me… ADHD and all that. Thanks to #onebookjuly I learned how my brain works in regard to planning, journaling, and what system works best for me.

After #onebookjuly, and on into the end of the year,  I worked on putting my systems in place, systems that work for me.

My Omni Journal: the Hub, sort of the Grand Central Station of everything, which is usually in my trifold Jonelifish Mermaid TN, along with a few inserts for specific things.

My Writer’s Bible, a Jonelifish TN (traveler’s notebook) that houses my writer bullet journal, my novel insert, and my writer journal.

My Projects Jonelifish TN, which housed my project bullet journal, an insert for the Dark Tower reading project, and a few other inserts for certain projects.

And my Hobonichi Techo Cousin (A5) that was sort of an art journal.

For 2017 I knew I wanted to change a few things. Make changes that would help me stay organized, still be creative, and would utilize my strengths and yet help me improve my weak areas (getting distracted easily, forgetting things even though I wrote them down, etc). So I took a look at the systems I had in place, what was working, what was only working so-so, and what I knew I wanted to change. Then I did a bit of research into what was out there. I love the Hobonichi. Love Tomoe River Paper. My Omni Journal has 68 gsm Tomoe River paper, it’s an Enigma from Taroko Design. 😀 And my prefered journal size is an A5, so I knew I wanted another Hobonichi Techo Cousin, but did I really have a need for it? And I wanted to try the Hobonichi A6 English planner, but (again) did I have a need for it? And then there was the Hobonichi Weeks. Need or Want?

If I’m being honest, the Hobonichis’ were wants, not needs. The Enigma–my Omni Journal is more than sufficient for all of my actual needs, but if I used it for every single thing I’d go through it in 3 months, which means I’d need 4 for the year instead of 2. I write a lot. Draw a lot. Write big…

Here is the video of my Coffee Chat about Journal/Planner overlap if you’d like more detail. Soon I’ll be doing a show and tell of exactly what I am using and how. 😀

 

 

November 6 2016

Real Life Tips for NaNoWriMo

The-Secret-Of-Writing-QuoteThe most popular bit of advice given in regard to writing are:

  • Writer’s write.
  • Just write.
  • Put your butt in the chair and write.
  • Write one word at a time.
  • Keep writing…

Each year I participate in NaNoWriMo (and NaNo’s Camps) to keep myself motivated to write everyday. Developing the habit of writing everyday is one of those crucial aspects of a writing career that is essential to success. Recently I heard someone say “If you’re not writing, you’re not a writer.” I think it’s important, as a creative person, to remember that there might be days when you don’t feel like writing, or being creative in general. When depression, anxiety, or life’s curve balls happen and the last thing you want or feel like doing is writing (or being creative). But if you want to thrive and survive as a creative person you have to find a way to get past those, to not only survive them but to thrive.

I love reading and writing. I also love drawing, painting with watercolors, coloring, writing in my journal… the combination of words and art help soothe my soul, they provide me with a healthy way to reduce my anxiety, stress, and help to keep the depression at bay. I’ve also noticed that journaling about my writing process, as well as my day, help keep me focused (and believe me, that’s hard to do since I have ADHD). When a shiny new idea pops up and tempts me to quit what I’m currently working on to go work on that shiny new idea, I just jot down the shiny new idea into my notebook, then go back to my current project.

When I’m afraid that I don’t know what to write next, or the fear of the blank page sends my anxiety into overdrive, instead of freezing and letting that fear overtake me I take a walk, read a chapter in the current book I’m reading (right now I’m re-reading the Stand by Stephen King), take a bath, get a cup of coffee or a bottle of water, eat a snack like cashews or a banana–during that time I’ve cleared my mind. The ability to write isn’t as super power. It takes commitment, diligence, resilience, and determination.

The best piece of advice I’ve ever been given in regard to writing is two parts:

  1. “If you want to be a writer, you must do two things above all others: read a lot and write a lot.” ~Stephen King
  2. “Just write, and keep writing until it’s finished.” Miss Franklin, my 9th grade English teacher.

King also said, “Reading is the creative center of a writer’s life.” I firmly believe that. If you don’t understand the basics of storytelling, of a book, how can you write one, especially a good one.

And when it comes to the actual writing, if you don’t write… you won’t have a book, and you can’t edit a blank page, can’t publish the book you don’t write… And the first draft isn’t going to be perfect, or as Hemingway said, “The first draft of anything is shit.” I remind myself of that daily. I also remind myself that the worst thing I’ve written that day is better than what I didn’t write. Letting go of the perfectionism is one of the best ways to survive  and thrive during NaNoWriMo. Turn off your inner editor when you’re writing the first draft. It’s called the Fugly First Draft for a reason.

Here is additional real life tips for NaNoWriMo:

Category: #amwriting, ADHD, Art Journal, Creativity, Depression, Fear, Goals, Inspiration, Life, Motivation, NaNoWriMo, Productivity, Uncategorized, Writing | Comments Off on Real Life Tips for NaNoWriMo
October 3 2016

September’s Wrap Up and October’s Happenings